More Effective

Hayashi, H; Koizumi, T; Sumita, S.; Yamakage, M. Relative clinical heat transfer effectiveness: Forced-air warming vs. Conductive fabric electric warming. ASA abstract 2015. Submitted for publication.

HOTDOG WARMS SIGNIFICANTLY FASTER THAN FORCED-AIR

Conductive fabric warming (HotDog) showed significantly higher warming rates than forced-air warming (FAW) (0.35˚C/hr vs 0.02˚C/hr), when all other relevant variables were held constant in a prospective, randomized controlled trial. The temperature difference between the two groups was statistically significant at each data point after 30 minutes.

The authors’ conclusion: “We conclude from these data that the clinical heat transfer effectiveness of [HotDog warming] is significantly greater than FAW convection. This is due to the combination of conductive heat transfer and the larger surface area of simultaneously heating from above and below the patient.”

WHY IS HOTDOG MORE EFFECTIVE?

Warm from above and below at the same time. No other technology can do this. Learn more in this PDF brochure.


 

FORCED-AIR LEAVES PATIENTS COLD

Evaluating core temperatures in 58,814 adults having surgery lasting >60 min, Cleveland Clinic research reveals that forced-air warming systems frequently fail to prevent hypothermia:

  • The incidence of hypothermia 2 hrs after induction was nearly 50%.1
  • “Intraoperative hypothermia was common, and often prolonged”

The Cleveland Clinic research confirms research published in 2014 in the Journal of Arthroplasty, revealing that a “disturbingly high” 26.9% of patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement remained hypothermic at the conclusion of surgery despite being warmed with Bair Hugger.* 3.7x more periprosthetic infections occurred in the cases where Bair Hugger failed.2

“[T]he perioperative use of Bair Hugger alone is not sufficient to prevent hypothermia in every orthopedic patient.”

1. Sessler, D. et al. Intraoperative Core Temperature Patterns, Transfusion Requirement, and Hospital Duration in Patients Warmed with Forced Air. Anesthesiology. 2015; 122:276-285.
2. Leijtens, Borg; et al. High Incidence of Postoperative Hypothermia in Total Knee and Total Hip Arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2013;28(6): 895-898.

* Bair hugger is a registered trademark of 3M

Need additional proof of HotDog patient warming effectiveness? Please review ECRI Institute’s recent comparative evaluation of HotDog patient warming.

 

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